Cyprus talks break up over schools controversy: Turkish Cypriot leader  

Cyprus talks break up over schools controversy: Turkish Cypriot leader   


NICOSIA: A round of UN-brokered peace talks between the rival leaders on divided Cyprus broke up in acrimony on Thursday over a 1950 referendum, the Turkish Cypriot leader said.

Tensions have soared over the approval by the Greek Cypriot parliament in the south of the divided island for schools to mark the 1950 referendum on Enosis, or union with Greece. Mustafa Akinci said that when the issue came up of cancelling the decision to mark the 1950 referendum, his Greek Cypriot counterpart Nicos Anastasiades said there "was nothing else to say, slammed the door and left."

"At that point there was nothing more to do as this meeting needs to be conducted in an atmosphere of respect so we also left the meeting," he told reporters. But Anastasiades expressed confusion over the situation. Akinci's "withdrawal was unwarranted and without cause or reason", he said on television, adding that UN envoy Espen Barth Eide, chairing the meeting, was also "unaware of what happened". The 1950 referendum -- before Cyprus won independence from colonial ruler Britain -- overwhelmingly approved Enosis but had no legal value. The schools legislation, sponsored by the far-right ELAM party, essentially calls for secondary school pupils to mark the referendum anniversary by learning about the event and reading leaflets dedicated to understanding the Enosis cause. In a letter to UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres on Wednesday, Akinci warned that the move would cause "great damage" to the peace process.