DailyTimes | 20 measles cases reported, minor dies, during past week

20 measles cases reported, minor dies, during past week

20 measles cases reported, minor dies, during past week

KARACHI: With the onset of hot weather, measles cases have started emerging in provincial capital of Sindh, Karachi. During outgoing week 20 cases were reported throughout Karachi, health officials claimed on Saturday.

Meanwhile a minor child died due to measles in Gaddap's Union Council 6 area.

Measles is a contagious disease that is caused by a virus. Measles starts with a fever, runny nose, cough, red eyes, and sore throat. It's followed by a rash that spreads over the entire body. Measles virus is a highly contagious virus and spreads through the air through coughing and sneezing.

The authorities have already started vaccination campaign in affected areas. "Vaccination campaign has been started in selected areas of Gaddap, Liaquatabad and Ibrahim Hyderi," said Dr Mohammad Taufeeq, Health Director Karachi adding that no case was reported on Friday and Saturday.

"Earlier during the week some suspected cases were reported from Liaquatabad area but laboratory results came out negative," he contented.

Health experts have stressed upon parents to get their children vaccinated. The only precaution to avoid children from measles is vaccination.

"Parents should get their children vaccinated at the age of 9 and 15 months," said Dr Khalid Shafi, General Secretary, Pakistan Pediatric Association, Sindh and assistant professor at Dow University of Health Sciences.

According to Dr Shafi, most of the cases coming at healthcare facilities are mostly those children who were not vaccinated. The vaccination is free and easily available at Expanded Programme on Immunization (EPI) Centers of hospitals which have EPI outlets.

"Basically there is an attitude problem on the part of parents who do not take the immunization seriously in the society. The percentage for vaccinated children needs to be improved and in this respect parents play vital role", Dr Shafi suggested.